Author Topic: Powdercoating  (Read 2680 times)

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« on: December 25, 2012, 07:11:38 PM »

jrpwracing

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Powdercoating
« on: December 25, 2012, 07:11:38 PM »
Just wanted to drop a note and let everyone know that JRPW Racing in Martinez is providing our custom Powdercoat service to the Augusta area. Multitudes of colors available. Incredible results, reasonable rates, and quick turnaround. Contact us today, Jimmy Rivers 706-863-1206

«Reply #1 on: December 26, 2012, 03:04:50 PM »

Rican240sx

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Powdercoating
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2012, 03:04:50 PM »
How much for Motorcycle Rears Sets in a matte/satin black?
Nick O.
07 Tundra
05 R1For Sale

Neighborhood nice guy.

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«Reply #2 on: December 26, 2012, 08:47:44 PM »

jrpwracing

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Powdercoating
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2012, 08:47:44 PM »
Motorcycle wheels usually run $45 each. Blasting to remove old powder or paint is $35 each. Extremely intricate wheels may cost a little more. Blacks are a single coat color, candies or others requiring a base coat usually run 50% more to coat due to the increased time and powder. Jimmy 706-863-1206

«Reply #3 on: December 26, 2012, 08:50:22 PM »

jrpwracing

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Powdercoating
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2012, 08:50:22 PM »
I just re-read post, if you are talking about gears, most are about $25ish each plus the blasting time. Jimmy

«Reply #4 on: December 27, 2012, 09:53:22 AM »

Rican240sx

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Powdercoating
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2012, 09:53:22 AM »
Rearsets are the Pegs.  

Here\'s a pic of the actual items I want to have done.

I would bring them to you dissembled.



&

Nick O.
07 Tundra
05 R1For Sale

Neighborhood nice guy.

«Reply #5 on: December 27, 2012, 09:54:43 AM »

Rican240sx

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Powdercoating
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2012, 09:54:43 AM »
one last thing

I have silver CRG levers I\'d like to get done while I am at it.



this is a bike like mine with the rear sets done (barley can see them in the photo).. but this is what I\'m looking for.

Nick O.
07 Tundra
05 R1For Sale

Neighborhood nice guy.

«Reply #6 on: December 27, 2012, 10:34:36 AM »

jrpwracing

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Powdercoating
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2012, 10:34:36 AM »
Ready, Willing, & Able, drop by anytime you like. Once I see the parts disassembled I can nail the price down, however it looks like $100-$125 out the door. Jimmy

«Reply #7 on: January 18, 2013, 08:46:18 PM »

Michael Yount

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Powdercoating
« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2013, 08:46:18 PM »
I ended up painting my aluminum alloy wheels instead of powder coating because I could never get a good answer about the possibility of strength loss to the wheels because of the heat required to set the coating.  Described below -- what\'s your take on this?  Thanks!  Michael

\"Treating of Alloy wheels Post manufacture
Powder coating temperature range 150 210 C.

Since the powder coating temperature overlaps with the strengthening temperature there could be strength
issues with the wheels after powder coating. It could cause the wheel to prematurely crack, at the very least the wheel material will become overaged and weaker.
The main saving grace here is that if the wheel was reasonably manufactured and inspected in the first place it should be ok. One would expect a structural safety factor for normal driving of 4, and maybe as low as 2 for tracking, but it is the reduction in fatigue life that will be a cause for concern due to the exponential reduction in fatigue life due to small reductions in strength of aluminium Alloys. Also with any reduction in strength, crack propagation becomes an issue, almost all wheels have cracks in them, the issue is are they large enough to propagate when stressed, and when does the crack become large enough to cause failure.\"
'82 Volvo 242; '10 Cayman S; '15 Fit

«Reply #8 on: January 24, 2013, 06:28:53 AM »

jrpwracing

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Powdercoating
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2013, 06:28:53 AM »
Having taken metallurgy classes years ago, unless you get in the vicinity of the melting point of the material, you will not structurally alter the base. Many, Many of todays performance and racing cars have powdercoated wheels and structural items, 375 or 400 degrees will not affect the strength of a wheel at all. Jimmy 706-863-1206

«Reply #9 on: January 24, 2013, 06:33:13 AM »

jrpwracing

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Powdercoating
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2013, 06:33:13 AM »
Basically, if the wheel is a good wheel, powdercoating will not harm it. If it\'s not a good wheel, powdercoating won\'t make it any worse. Even a pizza can stand 400degrees for 20 minutes

«Reply #10 on: January 24, 2013, 07:24:38 AM »

Michael Yount

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« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2013, 07:24:38 AM »
All due respect, you\'d best go back and pull those metallurgy books back out.  Annealing, stress relieving, many hardening heat treatments are ALL done at SIGNIFICANTLY lower temperatures than the melting point of the metal.  Depending on the alloy, aluminum melts in the 1220F range -- but, for just one example, certain annealing processes are  done around 650F.   For steel - depending on the alloy, melting point is around 2500F, but annealing, stress relieving, tempering can be accomplished in the 700F-1100F range depending on the alloy and what type of heat treatment is required.  So you don\'t have to get anywhere near the melting point to \'structurally alter the base\'.  And the pizza analogy....no comment.  lol

To get real specific - if you want to take a 6061 aluminum alloy (very commonly used in wheels and other automotive applications) from a T4 temper to a T6 temper you take it to only 325F.  Now - you hold it for 18 hours - but you can see that this is a temperature that is ROUTINELY exceeded in the baking part of the powder coating process.

So my question remains -- will you alter the temper  of a 6060-T6 aluminum alloy with the 400F baking?  I don\'t think you know the answer and I\'m concerned that you\'re just making stuff up.  Again - all due respect.
'82 Volvo 242; '10 Cayman S; '15 Fit

«Reply #11 on: January 24, 2013, 07:57:32 AM »

jrpwracing

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Powdercoating
« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2013, 07:57:32 AM »
No, I am not a metallurgist, don\'t claim to be. But look at a ZR1 vette or a Viper, or even many Ferrarris. If powdercoating alters the wheels to where they are structurally unsafe, trust me, you would already know it by now, and they would discontinue the practice. I do however stand by my comment that if you have a quality part, it will not harm it. Not trying to argue, but just look at the high end wheels that are coated. Very few are mill finish.

«Reply #12 on: January 24, 2013, 08:50:44 AM »

Michael Yount

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« Reply #12 on: January 24, 2013, 08:50:44 AM »
I wouldn\'t have had any problem if you\'d replied with that response.  But when you said you have to get it close to the melting temp to heat treat it.....well, it\'s simply a misstatement of fact.

If you peruse the racing sites there are some racers who simply aren\'t sure -- and in the spirit of not taking any more risk than they have to - they won\'t powder coat critical pieces (like wheels) out of an abundance of caution.  Others say pretty much what you did - \"I\'ve never had a problem.\"  

I suspect the issue is this - while the 350F-400F it takes to flow the coating (is that the right range?) is above the temperature needed to alter the grain structure of the aluminum, the amount of TIME you spend at that temp isn\'t enough to actually raise the temperature of the wheel high enough for long enough to do any harm.  But I\'ve yet to find an actual answer from a credible source.  How long is the part in the oven - how long is it subjected to what temperature?

One issue I have seen on steel wheels (SCCA Spec Racer/old Formula Renault) - someone powder coated them and coated the contact area where the lug nut butts up against the wheel.  Heavy braking caused the wheel to get much hotter than 350F in that localized region (heat transfer from the brakes) and it melted the coating UNDER the lug nut.  The result was, of course, that then the lug nut was \'loose\' - and it tore up 2 wheels/studs.  Luckily he didn\'t lose a wheel.  From that I concluded -- if you\'re going to powder coat - don\'t coat tapered area where the lug nut seats.
'82 Volvo 242; '10 Cayman S; '15 Fit

«Reply #13 on: January 24, 2013, 09:23:53 PM »

jrpwracing

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Powdercoating
« Reply #13 on: January 24, 2013, 09:23:53 PM »
Did not try to deceive at all, I just didn\'t and don\'t feel the time to bake the powder is enough to alter the metal. Cycle time is dependent upon the powder, but typical is 10-15 minutes once the oven re-reaches the 375-400 temp after the heat loss from opening the doors. Actual part temp is lower during a bit of the cycle. Extended exposure to the temps I agree can cause issues. Jimmy

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